Royal Governor Woodes Rogers

Royal Governor Woodes Rogers

A Poole boy, he lived in Thames Street when he was nine. His father had shipping and fishing business interests in Newfoundland and moved the family to Bristol, when Woodes was in his teens. In 1708, at just 28 years old Woodes commanded two ships on a round-the-world voyage. His maritime adventures were as a privateer. Later in life he became Royal Governor of the first colony of the Bahamas.

 

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